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Yes, Obamacare IS a Substantial Burden on Christian Businesses!

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Our own Andy Mounts explains why the Obamacare Mandate does pose a substantial burden to Christian businesses who believe it is their duty to provide healthcare for their employees by looking into the legal mumbo jumbo and dissecting the numbers.

Unless an exception applies, ACA requires an employer’s group health plan or group-health-insurance coverage to furnish “preventive care and screenings” for women without “any cost sharing requirements.” 42 U. S. C. §300gg–13(a)(4). Congress itself, however, did not specify what types of preventive care must be covered. Instead, Congress authorized the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), a component of HHS, to make that important and sensitive decision. Ibid. The HRSA in turn consulted the Institute of Medicine, a nonprofit group of volunteer advisers, in determining which preventive services to require.

In addition to these exemptions for religious organizations, ACA exempts a great many employers from most of its coverage requirements. Employers providing “grandfathered health plans”—those that existed prior to March

23, 2010, and that have not made specified changes after that date—need not comply with many of the Act’s requirements, including the contraceptive mandate. All told, the contraceptive mandate “presently does not apply to tens of millions of people. This is attributable, in large part, to grandfathered health plans: Over one-third of the 149 million non-elderly people in America with employer-sponsored health plans were enrolled in grandfathered plans in 2013.

Trending: MSNBC On Islamist Terror Attack: ‘We Don’t Know The Motive’ Yet

Hobby LobbyThe Greens, Hobby Lobby, and Mardel sued HHS and other federal agencies and officials to challenge the contraceptive mandate under RFRA and the Free Exercise Clause. The District Court denied a preliminary injunction, see 870 F. Supp. 2d 1278 (WD Okla. 2012), and the plaintiffs appealed, moving for initial en banc consideration. The Tenth Circuit granted that motion and reversed in a divided opinion. Contrary to the conclusion of the Third Circuit, the Tenth Circuit held that the Greens’ two for-profit businesses are “persons” within the meaning of RFRA and therefore may bring suit under that law. The court then held that the corporations had established a likelihood of success on their RFRA claim. The court concluded that the contraceptive mandate substantially burdened the exercise of religion by requiring the companies to choose between “compromis[ing] their religious beliefs” and paying a heavy fee—either “close to $475 million more in taxes every year” if they simply refused to provide coverage for the contraceptives at issue, or “roughly $26 million” annually if they “drop[ped] health-insurance benefits for all employees.”

As we have seen, RFRA was designed to provide very broad protection for religious liberty. By enacting RFRA, Congress went far beyond what this Court has held is constitutionally required. Is there any reason to think that the Congress that enacted such sweeping protection put small-business owners to the choice that HHS suggests? An examination of RFRA’s text, to which we turn in the next part of this opinion, reveals that Congress did no such thing. As we will show, Congress provided protection for people like the Hahns and Greens by employing a familiar legal fiction: It included corporations within RFRA’s definition of “persons.” But it is important to keep in mind that the purpose of this fiction is to provide protection for human beings. A corporation is simply a form of organization used by human beings to achieve desired ends.

An established body of law specifies the rights and obligations of the people (including shareholders, officers, and employees) who are associated with a corporation in one way or another. When rights, whether constitutional or statutory, are extended to corporations, the purpose is to protect the rights of these people. For example, extending Fourth Amendment protection to corporations protects the privacy interests of employees and others associated with the company. Protecting corporations from government seizure of their property without just compensation protects all those who have a stake in the corporations’ financial well-being. And protecting the free-exercise rights of corporations like Hobby Lobby, Conestoga, and Mardel protects the religious liberty of the humans who own and control those companies.

Under the Dictionary Act, “the wor[d] ‘person’ . . . include[s] corporations, companies, associations, firms, partnerships, societies, and joint stock companies, as well as individuals. (“We have no doubt that ‘person,’ in a legal setting, often refers to artificial entities. The Dictionary Act makes that clear”). Thus, unless there is something about the RFRA context that “indicates otherwise,” the Dictionary Act provides a quick, clear, and affirmative answer to the question whether the companies involved in these cases may be heard.

Obamacare-this-is-going-to-hurtPresumably in recognition of the weakness of this argument, both HHS and the principal dissent fall back on the broader contention that the Nation lacks a tradition of exempting for-profit corporations from generally applicable laws. By contrast, HHS contends, statutes like Title VII, 42 U. S. C. §2000e–19(A), expressly exempt churches and other nonprofit religious institutions but not for-profit corporations. See Brief for HHS in No. 13–356, p. 26. In making this argument, however, HHS did not call to our attention the fact that some federal statutes do exempt categories of entities that include for-profit corporations from laws that would otherwise require these entities to engage in activities to which they object on grounds of conscience. If Title VII and similar laws show anything, it is that Congress speaks with specificity when it intends a religious accommodation not to extend to for-profit corporations.

Finally, HHS contends that Congress could not have wanted RFRA to apply to for-profit corporations because it is difficult as a practical matter to ascertain the sincere “beliefs” of a corporation. HHS goes so far as to raise the specter of “divisive, polarizing proxy battles over the religious identity of large publicly traded corporations such as IBM or General Electric.” For example, the idea that unrelated shareholders—including institutional investors with their own set of stakeholders—would agree to run a corporation under the same religious beliefs seems improbable. In any event, we have no occasion in these cases to consider RFRA’s applicability to such companies. The companies in the cases before us are closely held corporations, each owned and controlled by members of a single family, and no one has disputed the sincerity of their religious beliefs.

…in these cases, the Hahns and Greens and their companies sincerely believe that providing the insurance coverage demanded by the HHS regulations lies on the forbidden side of the line, and it is not for us to say that their religious beliefs are mistaken or insubstantial. Instead, our “narrow function . . . in this context is to determine” whether the line drawn reflects “an honest conviction,” and there is no dispute that it does. Because the contraceptive mandate forces them to pay an enormous sum of money—as much as $475 million per year in the case of Hobby Lobby—if they insist on providing insurance coverage in accordance with their religious beliefs, the mandate clearly imposes a substantial burden on those beliefs.


 

Below are the 16 different forms of birth control provided under Obamacare, Hobby Lobby was only asking to be exempt from four of the 16 choices.

  1. Male condoms
  2. Female condoms
  3. Diaphragms with spermicide
  4. Sponges with spermicide
  5. Cervical caps with spermicide
  6. Spermicide alone
  7. Birth-control pills with estrogen and progestin (“Combined Pill)
  8. Birth-control pills with progestin alone (“The Mini Pill)
  9. Birth control pills (extended/continuous use)
  10. Contraceptive patches
  11. Contraceptive rings
  12. Progestin injections
  13. Implantable rods
  14. Vasectomies
  15. Female sterilization surgeries
  16. Female sterilization implants

There were four types of birth control at the center of Hobby Lobby’s contentions, though: Plan B, which is also known as the “morning after pill,” Ella, another emergency contraceptive, Copper Intrauterine Device and IUD with progestin — forms of birth control that some believe can cause or are akin to abortion.


How much is plan b? Quite affordable over the counter from Walgreens.

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Culture

ICE: Court Order Forced Them To Release 250 Immigrants With Criminal Histories

The public should know that the ruling undoubtedly places them at greater risk.’

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A California ruling has forced Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to release criminal aliens from detention in Adelanto.

“While opponents who continuously seek to discredit the agency might otherwise mislead the public to believe that those in detention pose no risk to public safety, nothing could be further from the truth,” he said. “ICE has complied with this overreaching court order; however, the public should know that the ruling undoubtedly places them at greater risk.”

Fox News:

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced on Tuesday that it released 250 immigrants with criminal histories in response to a coronavirus-related order issued by the Central District of California.

The news came a week after U.S. Judge Terry Hatter demanded the agency either release or deport detainees at the Adelanto ICE processing center in Southern California in order to halt the spread of coronavirus infections.

ICE claims that “despite requests to transfer detainees to alternative locations,” it ended up releasing 250 from the facility, which is run by a federal contractor. Those released had histories of a variety of crimes, including assualt with a deadly weapon, driving under the influence, “lewd/lascivious acts with a child,” child cruelty, illegal re-entry after removal, and other offenses.

ICE’s Senior Official Performing the Duties of the Director Tony H. Pham slammed the order as a danger to public safety and accused the court of overstepping its authority. More

This is what it sounds like to me: The best way to halt the spread of Coronavirus is to release those who may be infected into the general public.

Those being released have histories of a variety of crimes, including assualt with a deadly weapon, driving under the influence, “lewd and lascivious acts with a child,” child cruelty, illegal re-entry after removal, and other many other offenses.

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Culture

Kiddie Porn-Like ‘Cuties’ Show Sends Netflix Cancellations Soaring

Netflix lost a record number of subscribers after the backlash over its airing of ‘Cuties,’ the movie that sexually exploits little girls.

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Netflix lost a record number of subscribers after the backlash over its airing of Cuties, the movie that sexually exploits little girls.

According to a new review of the Netflix subscriber situation, the streamer saw its cancellation rate soar 800 percent as a result of its posting of the movie that turned 11-year-old girls into twerking strippers.

For those unaware, the movie hyper-sexualizes pre-adolescent girls by following a group of 11-year-old girls in France who start training to become strippers. They explore dressing in suggestive clothing, they begin learning to twerk suggestively, wear adult-like makeup, and generally try to emulate prostitutes.

Netflix recently claimed that it got “pretty close” to its forecast for new subscriber growth in the third quarter but didn’t quite make it.

But the numbers as analyzed by New York data analytics firms Antenna and YipitData did not find the same happy story that Netflix did with its report on subscribers.

Antenna, for instance, found that Netflix lost five times as many subscribers in September’s first couple of weeks than was lost in all of August. As it happens, the backlash against its posting of Cuties exploded at the beginning of September.

YipitData’s look at the numbers gave an even worse picture. YipitData revealed that September’s cancellations were 8 times of those in August. YipitData said the cancellation data was “a multi-year high” for lost subscribers.

Netflix has refused to bow to the boycott and has proudly stood up for its perverted film.

Looks like that was a very bad idea.

The streamer has also ben indicted for exploiting children.

Follow Warner Todd Huston on Facebook at: facebook.com/Warner.Todd.Huston.

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Culture

Rapper Who Bragged in Video About Ripping Off Unemployment Arrested by Feds

Rapper Nuke Bizzle who rapped about ripping off unemployment benefits was arrested him for the fraud.

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Rapper Nuke Bizzle thought he was the fo shizzle by rapping about how he was ripping off unemployment benefits, but apparently the feds were not amused and arrested him for the fraud.

According to a Department of Justice statement, the rapper, whose real name is Fontrell Antonio Baines, “boasted in a YouTube music video about getting rich from committing unemployment benefits fraud.”

The government alleges that the Los Angeles-based Bizzle and several of his buddies used fake addresses to defraud the agency of up to $700,000 in unemployment benefits.

He was arrested on Oct. 16 “pursuant to a criminal complaint alleging a scheme to fraudulently obtain unemployment insurance benefits under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act.”

Authorities were alerted to the fraud by people who saw and reported the rapper’s own videos.

In one of the videos, for instance, Bizzle bragged about “go[ing] to the bank with a stack of” unemployment cards.

The government added:

The affidavit further alleges that Baines bragged about his ability to defraud the EDD in a music video posted on YouTube and in postings to his Instagram account, under the handles “nukebizzle1” and “nukebizzle23.” For example, Baines appears in a music video called “EDD” in which he boasts about doing “my swagger for EDD” and, holding up a stack of envelopes from EDD, getting rich by “go[ing] to the bank with a stack of these” – presumably a reference to the debit cards that come in the mail. A second rapper in the video intones, “You gotta sell cocaine, I just file a claim….”

Bizzle faces a maximum of 22 years in prison related to the charges if he is convicted.

Follow Warner Todd Huston on Facebook at: facebook.com/Warner.Todd.Huston.

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Culture

Young Black Voters No Longer Loyal to the Democrat Party

More and more, Gen Z black voters are questioning why blacks should be loyal to the Democrat Party that they see as severely lacking in appeal.

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More and more, Gen Z black voters are questioning why blacks should be loyal to the Democrat Party that they see as severely lacking in appeal.

According to a report at Politico, many of these young blacks born after 1990 are wondering just why they should be all fired up about the Democrats when every single Democrat-run city in America is an absolute, bankrupt mess.

Certainly, blacks in the U.S. are still holding onto the outmoded idea that the Democrat Party is the “party of civil rights,” a false notion that gained steam in the 1970s. But things seem to be on the verge of changing.

A 2019 Pew Research Center study, for instance, found that liberals make up a majority of the Democratic voting bloc, but blacks are not so ready to claim to be liberal. 43 percent of them said they identified as moderate and 25 percent even identified as conservative.

Some of these blacks who consider themselves more conservative are realizing that the Democrat Party stands against families, for one. And that activism against traditional marriage and families is detrimental to the black community.

Many of these young black conservatives are organizing and talking amongst themselves about how bad the Democrat agenda has been for them.

As Fox News noted:

For example, Congress’ 1994 Crime Bill is being scrutinized anew by Gen Zers across the country. Many feel the bill, which Biden co-authored, disproportionately affects Black communities — even though the ban on assault weapons was popular among Black lawmakers almost 30 years ago.

Young Black conservatives say their support for Trump is based on policies that work for them: the First Step Act, the FUTURE Act and economic success leading to historically low Black unemployment numbers.

This growing movement is important for Republicans. Because, even though the Democrats have been able to count on the near total, blind support of blacks in the past, with elections often as close as they have been recently, even if 10 to 30 percent of blacks stray from the Democrats, it could hurt the leftist party’s chances of winning elections.

Follow Warner Todd Huston on Facebook at: facebook.com/Warner.Todd.Huston.

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Culture

Trump Was Right-Harvard Admits Patients Over COVID Have ‘Long-Lasting Immunity’

Twitter censored what it called “Trump’s false claim” that he has immunity from COVID-19, but now even Harvard is admitting that Trump may be right.

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On Wednesday, social media giant Twitter censored what it called “Trump’s false claim” that he has immunity from COVID-19, but now even Harvard is admitting that Trump may be right.

“A total and complete sign off from White House Doctors yesterday. That means I can’t get it (immune), and can’t give it. Very nice to know!!!” Trump wrote on Twitter Sunday.

But Wednesday, Twitter had added a warning label that claimed that Trump’s tweet “violated the Twitter Rules about spreading misleading and potentially harmful information related to COVID-19.”

Twitter’s operatives — who are now apparently posing as scientists and doctors when not a one of them are either — took it upon themselves to “correct” the president of the United States.

But now, even Harvard University is admitting that Trump was on to something with his claims of immunity.

In an October 8 posting, the university noted that “people who survive serious COVID-19 infections have long-lasting immune responses against the virus.”

“The study, published in Science Immunology, offers hope that people infected with the virus will develop lasting protection against reinfection. The study also demonstrates that measuring antibodies can be an accurate tool for tracking the spread of the virus in the community,” the story added.

So, who the hell does Twitter think they are censoring the president when actual doctors and scientists have said that Trump is probably right. He does have an amount of immunity now that he has come through the coronavirus.

Ah, but Twitter knows better.

Follow Warner Todd Huston on Facebook at: facebook.com/Warner.Todd.Huston.

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Culture

Texas Grand Jury Indicts Netflix For Exploitation Of Children Over ‘Cuties’ Movie

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Texas Grand Jury Indicts Netflix For Exploitation Of Children Over ‘Cuties’ Movie

A Tyler County grand jury has indicted Netflix Inc. in connection with a controversial movie titled Cuties. The grand jury indicted the California-based streaming service on a charge of the promotion of lewd visual material depicting a child.

State Rep. Matt Schaefer, R-Tyler, tweeted the text of the indictment on Tuesday. He also included the hashtags #Cuties and #txlege.

“Netflix indicted by grand jury in Tyler Co, for promoting material in Cuties film which depicts lewd exhibition of pubic area of a clothed or partially clothed child who was younger than 18 yrs of age which appears to the prurient interest in sex,” Schaefer said in his tweet.

Westphalian TImes:

A Texas Grand Jury indicted Netflix for ‘knowingly’ promoting material in the film “Cuties” which depicts “the lewd exhibition of the genitals or pubic area of a clothed or partially clothed child who was younger than 18 years of age.” More

The text of the indictment states that Netflix knowingly promotes “visual material which depicts the lewd exhibition of the genitals or pubic area of a clothed or partially clothed child who was younger than 18 years of age at the time the visual material was created, which appeals to the prurient interest in sex and has no serious literary, artistic, political, or scientific value… “

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Culture

CNN Analyst And Former FBI Agent “We Have A Biological Terrorist In The White House”

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CNN Analyst And Former FBI Agent “We Have A Biological Terrorist In The White House”

Asha Rangappa, an analyst for CNN and a former FBI special agent tweeted: “We have a biological terrorist in the White House.” This follows President Trump’s return to the White House on Monday evening after treatment for the Coronavirus.

Defending her claim, Asha Rangappa cited a Justice Department memo stating back in March that the novel Coronavirus “appears to meet the statutory definition of a biological agent” and that those who engage in the “purposeful exposure and infections of others” could be charged for terrorism-related offenses.

While there are allegations that he knew about his positive diagnosis significantly earlier than he had announced it on Thursday evening, there is no certifiable evidence that he knowingly exposed officials and staffers to the virus.

Twitter took aim!

Vile Democrats joined in with her:

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